Sustainable Roads Analysis

Road 17, MBSNF

Sustainable roads analysis. What is it?

The Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest must identify a more ecologically and financially sustainable road system by 2015. The Travel Management Rule of 2005 requires all national forests to analyze their roads and  propose transportation systems that meet travel, administrative and resource protection needs within available budgets. The Sustainable Roads Analysis will help the Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest gather the information necessary to make future decisions about road projects such as upgrades, closures, decommissioning, and road-to-trail conversions.

Before proceeding with any future road projects,  the Forest Service will conduct National Environmental Policy Act analyses.

This situation isn’t just about a report. The reality of the road budget decline is hitting us today.

The Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest has only enough money to maintain about a quarter of its 2,500 miles of roads. Last year they had $688,000 to pay for maintenance, this year they expect $200,000. Not only have road maintenance funds been reduced, but other funds have been reduced or eliminated, including Legacy Roads and Trails, Emergency Relief of Federally Owned Roads (ERFO), Recovery (Stimulus), Rural Aid to Counties (RAC – Title II), Salmon Recovery Funding Board (SRFB) and other grants.

For 2013, the forest’s expected funding will maintain 628 miles of roads. Of those roads, they plan to maintain 86 percent for passenger car use and the remaining 14 percent for high-clearance vehicles. The Mt. Baker-Snoqulamie National Forest anticipates a 10 percent reduction of road maintenance funding.

Maintenance costs are expensive. A rough estimate shows that roads maintained for high-clearance vehicles costs an average of about $715 per mile, while those maintained for passenger cars cost about $1,750 per mile.

Right now, as the snow melts and Forest Service engineers assess the road damage, they are adopting strategies to work within this year’s reduced funding by cutting back on brushing, filling potholes instead of grading the entire road and not replacing as many culverts. They don’t know what to expect next year, but they do know there will be less money.

One response to “Sustainable Roads Analysis

  1. I believe forest service road 17 should be looked into. My property parallels this so I see a lot of traffic going up and down. I also notice trucks with garbage and come down with it empty! This road is definitely “abused” and not taken care of as much as it should be for the traffic that goes on it. The slide (top photo on your page) that occurred a few years ago went through my property. There was no where to go up the hill (except right over my waterline) so people would drive up to turn right back around. I got sick of it so I called the Forest Service to put something up to block the road. They did, and people kept knocking it into the bushes and driving on through… Again, just to turn around a 1/4 mile up!!! Anyway, long story short, I think that a solid gate should be put up and certain people have a key, me, other property owner (logging), people who pay to use it certain times of year (snowmobilers), etc.

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